Barry McGee

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Barry McGee and Clare Rojas debut a joint exhibition at Alessandra Bonomo Gallery in Rome, Italy. Showcasing the couple’s visual harmony inside the gallery space, the exhibition features sharp geometrical forms inspired by Eastern European, Amish, and Native American tradition.

McGee adds a range of minimalist sculptures and paper-maché pieces to the studio-like installation. In addition to cultural influences, the art selection highlights graffiti art, folk art, and Op art in a playful, yet sophisticated showing. Opened on October 8, the Barry McGee and Clare Rojas exhibition will be open to view until the end of the year.

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Alex Couwenberg

ALEX COUWENBERG : SESSIONS : THE MAKING OF LA FONDA from ERIC MINH SWENSON on Vimeo.

Film by Eric Minh Swenson. Music by The Hitchikers, James Lucchesi, and Mick Cripps.

Born and raised in Southern California , painter Alex Couwenberg creates images that are inspired by the elements indigenous to his surroundings. From Los Angeles , Couwenbergs work references and suggests the aesthetic associated with mid-century modernism, car culture, skateboards, and surfboards.

Not to leave out, paying homage to the historical styles of post-war art making associated with Los Angeles and Southern California throughout the 1950’s, 60’s, and 70’s. Couwenbergs paintings give a nod towards the Hard-edge abstractionists, the finish fetish, and the light and space artists. Not content to replicate, he uses the sensibility of Eames-era design and hard-edge geometric abstraction as points of departure for creating paintings. His process, an additive and reductive series of moves and passes, creates multilayered environments that are deep and sensual. He harnesses these ideas into harmonious results, reflecting the visual landscape of his environment.

A graduate from Art Center College of Design and The Claremont Graduate School, Couwenberg worked under the guidance of Karl Benjamin, one of the leading figures in the Southern California based school of Hard-edge geometric abstraction. Benjamin was instrumental in the development of his painting style, process, and philosophy.

A Southern California native, Couwenberg naturally embraced this sensibility and applied it to his art making practices. By instilling the discipline and work ethic associated with these philosophies into his process, the paintings began to mature and develop a visual voice. The vocabulary references the dedication toward craft, process, and the progression of concepts and techniques.

Enjoy, The Narrative

Barry Island

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The Barry Island wall was created with designer Josh Young at Part-Two Creative, local climber Rob Larney and the Barry Island History Group, and its design is inspired by the area’s heritage: hidden in each letter is a word or phrase with local significance, from The Strollers, the name of a local dance band, to Tafelberg, an oil tanker which beached on Barry Island but was later repaired and used as a military ship during World War Two

Young also held workshops with local school children to determine some of the shapes that could be used for climbing holds (some relate to the area, others have a seaside or sporting theme) and says the colourful design is in part inspired by a toy shop, the Toy Factory, that once stood on the site. “I wanted it to look almost as if the Toy Factory had exploded and its contents had blown away,” he adds.

While many of Young’s previous projects make use of natural materials such as wood and granite, the Barry Island installation is made out of sheets of recycled plastic, cut using the same machine he used for the Comedy Carpet. “I had been looking at ways to use recycled plastics for a while and it worked well for this – it’s affordable, colourful and resilient against salt water,” he explains. “It’s a material we have so much of, but often don’t really know what to do with, and I think it could be used a lot more,” he adds. – CR BLog

 

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Terri Hooley

RBMA ‘Terri Hooley’ from Motherland on Vimeo.

During the 1970’s, Northern Ireland was seen as a musical wasteland. Bands struggled to get recognition and found it difficult to be heard because of geography and politics. There were few outlets for people to go to hear new music and socialise in a worry free environment. Terri Hooley changed all that.

In the late 1970’s Terri opened up the record shop “Good Vibrations” on the most bombed street in Europe at the time. The record shop was a major focal point for the local music scene. Inspired by the people he met through the shop and the talent he saw in Belfast, he set up a label of the same name. The label went on to release music from numerous bands from the Belfast punk and ska scene.

A self confessed, “terrible businessman” Terri oversaw the shop open and close 11 times and the label never really generated much income. Despite all that, Terri kept going.

A colossus of the music scene in Northern Ireland, Terri Hooley is a living legend. Without Terri, many punk bands would have remained unheard of during the Troubles. Terri’s bravery and dogged determination ensured that this would not be the case. He sparked a punk revolution that put Belfast back on the musical map.

We spent a weekend with Terri in his beloved city of Belfast. He showed us around some of his old haunts and shed new insights on his life in music. For a 65 year old man, Terri still has the energy and enthusiasm of a young punk.

Client: Red Bull
Director: Ross Killeen
Producer: Ellen Kenny
Camera Operator: Albert Hooi
Editor: Joe Rigby

Draplin’s Junk

#LIVINGOFFTHEWALL – Aaron Draplin & The Art of the Side Hustle Pt 1 from Vans OffTheWall.TV on Vimeo.

So fun to see other designers making weird noises over small, clean pieces of design. Ohhhhh.

Documentarian: Jared Eberhardt.

We meet Aaron Draplin at his day job as a designer at his studio, Draplin Design Company in Portland, Oregon. The tour quickly devolves into a discussion of his vast collections of well-organized junk, and includes a trip to an estate sale where Aaron picks up an ancient bag of peanut butter chips.

 

Enjoy, The Narrative.

Press Pause Play

PressPausePlay from House of Radon on Vimeo.

The digital revolution of the last decade has unleashed creativity and talent in an unprecedented way, with unlimited opportunities.

But does democratized culture mean better art or is true talent instead drowned out? This is the question addressed by PressPausePlay, a documentary film containing interviews with some of the world’s most influential creators of the digital era. www.presspauseplay.com @presspauseplay Facebook: http://on.fb.me/y4gEK1

If you like the film you can support us by rating it on IMDB – http://imdb.to/jUqhFn. Thanks! – www.houseofradon.com

10 Seconds

10 Seconds from The Pressure on Vimeo.

Mike Heist has been working in the neon industry in Portland, Oregon for 30 years. He is a master in his craft, and is responsible for the bending of some of the city’s most iconic signage. 10 SECONDS is a short film about work and happiness, and shares a bit of Mike’s thoughts and insight into the amazing process of hand-made neon signage.

The Pressure designed the sign as a component of event branding for the AIGA Portland event “Design and Happiness,” a lecture by Stefan Sagmeister during Design Week Portland. We thought that this video would add some depth to the concept, and we hope you enjoy it.

Reach Mike Heist at neondist.com

 

Enjoy, The Narrative

Alan Kitching & Monotype

Alan Kitching and Monotype from Monotype on Vimeo.

“My name’s Alan Kitching, I’m a letterpress typographer, designer, artist, and I’ve been working in this business for most of my life.”

Short film that offers a behind-the-scenes look at Kitching’s studio and collection of physical type, as well as his work creating a set of posters that pay tribute to the centenary of five hugely influential graphic designers: Tom Eckersley, Paul Rand, FHK Henrion, Josef Müller-Brockmann and Abram Games.

Enjoy, The Narrative.

THE DIATOMIST

The Diatomist from Matthew Killip on Vimeo.

THE DIATOMIST is a short documentary about Klaus Kemp, master of the Victorian art of diatom arrangement.

Diatoms are single cell algae that create jewel-like glass shells around themselves. Microscopists of the Victorian era would arrange them into complex patterns, invisible to the naked eye but spectacular when viewed under magnification.The best of these arrangements are stunning technical feats that reveal the hidden grandeur of some of the smallest organisms on Earth. Klaus Kemp has devoted his entire life to understanding and perfecting diatom arrangement and he is now acknowledged as the last great practitioner of this beautiful combination of art and science. THE DIATOMIST showcases his incredible work.

Soundtrack by Ryuichi Sakamoto, Bernard Herrmann and Cults Percussion Ensemble.

MATTHEW KILLIP is an English filmmaker living in New York. His documentaries have been broadcast on UK television and exhibited in festivals including Sundance and True/False.